July Reading List

Kozak’s Korner   (Recommended Reading)

Here is Archbishop Chaput’s homily from the closing Mass of the Fortnight for Freedom:

http://usccb.org/issues-and-action/religious-liberty/fortnight-for-freedom/fortnight-freedom-closing-mass-homily-archbishop-chaput.cfm

Call to Action: http://www.headlinebistro.com/en/columnists/lopez/070612.html#

http://www.thepublicdiscourse.com/2012/06/5562?printerfriendly=true

http://www.firstthings.com/onthesquare/2012/06/christianity-is-not-for-quitters

http://www.firstthings.com/onthesquare/2012/05/joyful-evangelization

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ZENIT—The World Seen From Rome

Mourning a Child and Robbed of Words to Express It
The Tragedy of Miscarriage and Abortion ‘Rights’
    By Rebecca Oas, PhD

  WASHINGTON, D.C., JULY 11, 2012 (Zenit.org).- One of the traditional names given to the Blessed Virgin Mary is “Our Lady of Sorrows,” a title under which the faithful reflect on the sorrowful events of her life, specifically the traditional Seven Sorrows. Each of these focuses on a painful event of separation from her Son Jesus, whether prefigured in the prophecy of Simeon, threatened during the Flight to Egypt, experienced briefly prior to the Finding in the Temple, or finally embraced fully in the events surrounding the Crucifixion and burial of Jesus. 

The grief of Mary has been expressed beautifully in art through the centuries, such as Michaelangelo’s famous Pieta, and for many women who have experienced the loss of a child, the sorrows of Our Lady carry a particularly personal significance.

Because of the uniquely strong bond between a mother and a child, added to the sense of untimeliness when a person dies before his or her parents, the effects of maternal bereavement have been a frequent topic of study and concern for psychologists.

A recent study from the University of Notre Dame analyzed a large population of mothers in the United States aged 20 to 50 and found that in the first two years following the death of a child, the mother’s own risk of early death was elevated 133% over those mothers who had not lost a child (1). The authors found that the effects of bereavement were great regardless of the age of the child or the cause of death. While this study did not examine the impact of bereavement on fathers, the authors cited a previous study from Denmark in which the risks were shown to be elevated for mothers compared to fathers (2). 

Although both the Danish and American studies took into account socioeconomic factors, education level, and marital status of the bereaved mothers, neither considered the impact of religious faith on their ability to cope with the tragic loss of a child. However, many other reports have cited the positive effects of faith when dealing with stressful situations, including a review article which specifically highlights the importance of religion and spirituality when coping with the death of a child (3). The authors of the review emphasize that the death of a child is an “uncontrollable life event” and outlined some of the specific ways in which religious practices help a bereaved parent cope, such as the surrendering of control of the situation to God, the choice to seek intimacy with others in a religious context and closeness to God, and the search for supernatural meaning in the midst of loss.

 For the rest of this article go to:

http://www.zenit.org/article-35173?l=english

Inspiration for Life

The prayer campaign finds its inspiration in Pope John Paul II’s landmark encyclical Evangelium Vitae, No. 100:

“In this great endeavor to create a new culture of life we are inspired and sustained by the confidence that comes from knowing that the Gospel of life, like the Kingdom of God itself, is growing and producing abundant fruit (cf. Mk 4:26-29). There is certainly an enormous disparity between the powerful resources available to the forces promoting the “culture of death” and the means at the disposal of those working for a “culture of life and love”. But we know that we can rely on the help of God, for whom nothing is impossible (cf. Mt 19:26).

Filled with this certainty, and moved by profound concern for the destiny of every man and woman, I repeat what I said to those families who carry out their challenging mission amid so many difficulties: a great prayer for life is urgently needed, a prayer which will rise up throughout the world. Through special initiatives and in daily prayer, may an impassioned plea rise to God, the Creator and lover of life, from every Christian community, from every group and association, from every family and from the heart of every believer. Jesus himself has shown us by his own example that prayer and fasting are the first and most effective weapons against the forces of evil (cf. Mt 4:1-11). As he taught his disciples, some demons cannot be driven out except in this way (cf. Mk 9:29). Let us therefore discover anew the humility and the courage to pray and fast so that power from on high will break down the walls of lies and deceit: the walls which conceal from the sight of so many of our brothers and sisters the evil of practices and laws which are hostile to life. May this same power turn their hearts to resolutions and goals inspired by the civilization of life and love.”

National Prayer for Life Campaign

Knights, Sisters of Life Urge Prayer for Life

At a Mass on May 3, commemorating the 10th anniversary of the passing of His Eminence John Cardinal O’Connor, Archbishop Timothy M. Dolan of New York initiated a National Prayer Campaign for Life, which is being co-sponsored by the Sisters of Life and the Knights of Columbus.

Knights, Catholics and all people of good will are invited to join in raising up a great prayer for life across the nation through the daily recitation of this prayer:

 

on our knees

 

Eternal Father, Source of Life,
strengthen us with your Holy Spirit to receive the abundance of life you have promised.
 
Open our hearts to see and desire the beauty of your plan for life and love.
 
Make our love generous and self-giving so that we may be blessed with joy.
 
Grant us great trust in your mercy.
 
Forgive us for not receiving your gift of life
and heal us from the effects of the culture of death.
 
Instill in us and all people reverence for every human life.
 
Inspire and protect our efforts on behalf of those most vulnerable especially the unborn, the sick and the elderly.
 
We ask this in the Name of Jesus, who by His Cross makes all things new.
 
Amen.
 
Our Lady of Guadalupe, pray for us.

 

     How to Order Copies of the Prayer Card

In Support of Our Church

Church Activities

Knights from Sacred Heart University in Fairfield, Conn., greet Supreme Chaplain Bishop William E. Lori following a Mass Bishop Lori celebrated at the Sacred Heart in 2009
 
Knights from Sacred Heart University in Fairfield, Conn., greet Supreme Chaplain Bishop William E. Lori following a Mass Bishop Lori celebrated at the Sacred Heart in 2009.

Catholics are searching for ways to further develop the ministry of our Church.

If these good intentions are going to bear fruit, if the Church is going to not only exist, but thrive in today’s society, men and women throughout our communities must come forward and take an active part.

Far more action of an ecumenical nature is needed. As Knights of Columbus, our prime responsibility is to encourage and promote that action.

The lay apostolate must respond to the constant call for active involvement in the work of the Church. Your council-5476 has the numbers, the organization, and the communication ability to get involved and spread the word throughout the Christian community.

Appeal for greater unity, understanding and ecumenism among all religions. Initiate those programs through which members can practice their Catholic duties in the fields of charity, devotion and education.

Strive to sponsor activities which enable the individual Knight to set a constant and worthy example as an ideal Catholic to his family, his community and his fellow members.

Contact St. Bridget Church Knights of Columbus Council-5476 for more information, or if you have any questions.

Actively Pro-family

Family Activities

Take a look at what’s happening to our family life. Do we communicate? Do we share? Do we take time to get involved with each other? Are there opportunities for improvement? What is God’s plan for us?

Today’s society makes it hard to be a family. Television takes up a lot of our time together. The hustle and bustle of business, rushed meals, school, work, committee meetings, sports and shopping are cramming our days and weeks.

 

The family is under heavy attack today. The battle is largely over values and commitments. To survive, the family needs support. Its primary source of strength must be found in a growing religious and parish life. But it also can be helped substantially by an organization such as ours.

Help prevent the death of the family by administering preventive medicine.

Conduct those programs and activities which aid in rebuilding the family spirit from within, making it vital and strong enough to resist society’s ills. Encourage members and their families to choose as their model the Holy Family, copying their attitude of interdependence, sharing and respect for authority.

Work to strengthen family life. Nourish wholesome home life through the sponsorship of activities involving entire families on a scheduled and continuing basis. Encourage communications and routines which involve family members within their own homes as well as bringing families together in social and recreational events in the community.

Stimulate togetherness within family units. There are many ways in which families can enjoy time together in a scheduled, organized way, even when the age range of members of the family varies widely.

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Being Pro-Community

Community Activities

Wherever we live, whether New York or British Columbia, we all have our own perceptions of “community.”

Usually, these perceptions are formed by the concrete reality of the world immediately around us. It may be a bustling metropolis, a town, a tiny village, a large county, a broad rural area.

It is the place we call home – with all its good and bad features, its beauty and ugliness, its strengths and weaknesses. Every individual has a voice in shaping the world around him, and every individual can make that voice heard.

Make your voice heard in your community.

Do more than throw up your hands in despair over what’s wrong with the world.

Your community offers limitless opportunity for action that can be seen, felt and judged for its true worth.

Look for something that’s needed and workable in your community – fight poverty, aid individuals with intellectual disabilities, plant a tree, sponsor a blood pressure screening, support law enforcement, campaign for every baby’s right to life, help the aged – whatever your community’s needs, your members’ interests and your council’s resources allow.

No matter what you choose … get involved!

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Prayer for Religious Liberty

 Sent Earlier this month:

Prayer for Religious Liberty

Almighty God, Father of all nations, for freedom you have set us free in Christ Jesus. We praise and bless you for the gift of religious liberty, the foundation of human rights, justice, and the common good.


Grant to our leaders the wisdom to protect and promote our liberties; By your grace may we have the courage to defend them, for ourselves and for all those who live in this blessed land.


We ask this through the intercession of Mary Immaculate, our patroness, and in the name of your Son, our Lord Jesus Christ, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, with whom you live and reign, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

   

Hello world!

WELCOME to Knights of Columbus – Council 5476’s new web site, established July 18, 2012! This is our invitation to follow us online, contact us for more information, or join us in our good works.

Membership in the Knights of Columbus provides the opportunity for a wholesome association with other Catholic gentlemen who recognize the same beliefs of duty to God, family & neighbors. Programs are tailored to individual members’ interests.

Council 5476 meets on the fourth Thursday of each month at 6:30 PM. Meetings take place in the basement of the Church Rectory, in the Knight’s meeting hall.

Men of Saint Bridget Parish: Come round out your lives with acts of Charity, Unity, Fraternity, and Patriotism. Become a Knight of Columbus!”