St. Expeditus Catholic Professionals Networking Social

Social Networking for Business Professionals

Please consider attending their next networking social at the BOAT HOUSE on the James at 5:00 PM Wednesday, August 22nd in order to learn more about this Catholic Professionals Networking group.

Saint Expeditus was formed in order to for members to expand their network and promote their business with fellow members of the Catholic Church. We meet weekly in order to share ideas, discuss and develop friendships with the goal of assisting each other in reaching the next level or their personal goals.

Our mission is simple, to help members increase their business through a structured, positive and professional program that enables them to develop long-term, meaningful relationships with those who share in the same belief and values of the Catholic Church.

Meeting every Wednesday Morning from 8:00- 9:30am at
Nick’s Roman Terrace

OUR NEXT BIG OUTING: Wednesday, August 22nd

By giving business to others, you will get business in return.

http://www.saintexpeditusgroup.org/

Suggested Reading

Kozak’s Korner   (Recommended Reading)

http://www.thepublicdiscourse.com/2012/07/6013?printerfriendly=true (Archbishop Chaput on Religious Freedom)

 Why Catholicism Matters:  How Catholic Virtues Can Reshape Society In The 21st Century

By Bill Donohue (President of the Catholic League for Religious and Civil Rights)

Well, due to current events, this might be interesting to concerned Catholics—an exchange of letters:

http://budget.house.gov/uploadedfiles/ryanlettertodolan4292011.pdf

 http://budget.house.gov/uploadedfiles/dolanresponsetoryan5_18.pdf

 And, a speech at Georgetown about Catholic Social Teaching and budgets:

 http://www.nationalreview.com/blogs/print/297054 

 

ZENIT—The World Seen From Rome – 8-2-12

Sexual Content in the Movies

 Risky Behavior, Pregnancy and Diseases
 

ROME, AUG. 2, 2012 (Zenit.org).- The media really does influence adolescents’ behavior and early exposure to sexual content in the movies leads them to commence sexual activity at an earlier age and to take more risks.

This was the conclusion of a study just published in the journal Psychological Science, titled “Greater Exposure to Sexual Content in Popular Movies Predicts Earlier Sexual Debut and Increased Sexual Risk Taking.”

It started by noting how it is documented that the media influences adolescent behavior in such areas as alcohol and tobacco use, but that less is known about its impact on sexual behavior.

Starting sexual activity at an earlier age is associated with a greater number of partners and an increased risk of sexually transmitted diseases. More than 9 million new cases of sexual diseases occur annually among adolescents in the United States, the paper observed.

“Popular movies provide adolescents with a wealth of sexual exposure, much of which may promote risk behaviors,” the authors commented.

They cited a survey that looked at movies released from 1950 to 2006. It showed that more than 84% contained some sexual content. In addition the survey found that the level of sexual explicitness of PG-13 and R-rated movies has increased in the past decade.

Not only are adolescents influenced by what they see, but one survey found that 57% of those aged 14-16 use the media as a primary source of sexual information.

The study published in Psychological Science looked at movie sexual exposure (MVE) in those aged under 16. A longitudinal study was carried out over the period June 2003 to October 2009.

It consisted in a random telephone survey of 6,522 adolescents, aged 10 to 14. After the initial contact they were followed up three subsequent times.

They found that higher exposure to explicit sexual content was an accurate predictor of riskier sexual behavior. The authors said that this study confirms previous ones and also found that this exposure, “has a lasting influence on risky sexual behaviors in adulthood.”

Reducing adolescent’s viewing of sexually explicit content “would delay their sexual debut and also reduce their engagement in risky sexual behaviors later in life,” they concluded.